New CNI Conversations: e-textbooks, enhanced reality, more

In the February 17, 2011 podcast, CNI director Clifford Lynch talks about the Paul Evan Peters Award, to be presented to UCLA professor Christine Borgman at CNI’s spring meeting on April 4 in San Diego, CA; Borgman will present the Peters’ Lecture at that time. Cliff also makes note of a recent announcement made by the California Digital Library and partners regarding data management plans.

 

Both Cliff and Joan Lippincott, CNI associate director, reflect on the recent EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) meeting in Washington, DC and the 2011 Horizon Report.

CNI Conversations continues to be available at http://conversations.cni.org/ (to subscribe to the audio feed add http://conversations.cni.org/feed to iTunes, or any podcatcher).  We hope you enjoy this program and we welcome your feedback.  For questions or comments related to CNI Conversations, please contact CNI Associate Executive Director Joan Lippincott at joan@cni.org.

Feb. 17, 2011

Audio Recording [mp3 26:52 min.]
February 17, 2011

In the February 17, 2011 podcast, CNI director Clifford Lynch talks about the Paul Evan Peters Award, to be presented to UCLA professor Christine Borgman at CNI’s spring meeting on April 4 in San Diego, CA; Borgman will present the Peters Lecture at that time.  Cliff also makes note of a recent announcement made by the California Digital Library and partners regarding data management plans.

Both Cliff and Joan Lippincott, CNI associate director, discuss the recent EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) meeting in Washington, DC and the 2011 Horizon Report.

We hope you enjoy this program and we welcome your feedback.  For questions or comments related to CNI Conversations, please contact CNI Associate Executive Director Joan Lippincott at joan@cni.org.

2011 Horizon Report now available

The 2011 Horizon Report, a collaborative initiative of the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) is now available for free download from:

http://www.educause.edu/Resources/2011HorizonReport/223122

Each year the report identifies and describes key trends that a group of experts believe will have an impact on teaching, learning and creative inquiry. This year, some of those trends are: electronic books, mobiles, augmented reality, game-based learning, gesture-based computing, and learning analytics.

I highly recommend this report for those who wish to get a concise overview of important trends; in addition, the report includes examples of existing uses of the technologies it highlights and provides links to additional materials. Full disclosure – I served as a member of the Advisory Board for the second year.

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Joan K. Lippincott
Associate Executive Director
Coalition for Networked Information

Digital Humanities at Small Liberal Arts College: Innovation and Intergration

Rebecca Frost Davis
Program Officer for the Humanities
National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE)

The digital humanities first flourished at doctoral research universities, but as the field has developed, its methodologies, topics of research, and disciplinary approaches have emerged more widely, even at small liberal arts colleges, whose primary mission is teaching undergraduates. For them, digital humanities helps scholars think how the digital revolution affects and changes the disciplines, and liberal arts education in general. They also help students develop and practice important liberal arts skills, such as critical thinking and effective communication within the changed information environment of the digital age. While early engagement in the digital humanities at these colleges often took the form of isolated grant-created faculty projects, more recently, several small liberal arts colleges, including Hamilton College, Occidental College, and Wheaton College, have taken steps to engage with the digital humanities at the institutional level. These institutions face significant challenges in sustaining large-scale, collaborative digital projects typical of the field.

This briefing will present findings of ongoing research into how digital humanities fits into the culture and structure of these small liberal arts colleges, and it will explore how they cope with limited staff, infrastructure, and funding. These cases demonstrate the value of engaging undergraduates for promoting digital humanities, popularizing digital methodologies, engaging the public in digital efforts, reenergizing traditional humanities disciplines, and training future digital humanists. They also offer models for inter-institutional collaboration that will be important in the development of major cyberinfrastructure projects for the humanities.

http://www.nitle.org/help/digital_humanities.php

    Handout (PDF)